Friday, April 18, 2014

(Source: inthenoosphere)

Thursday, April 17, 2014

ombuarchitecture:

LUGO HISTORY MUSEUM

Lugo, Spain 2007-2011

By Nieto Sobejano Architect

Monday, April 14, 2014

archatlas:

Wild Concrete Romain Jacquet-Lagreze

"Wild Concrete is a photographic series focusing on a very singular phenomenon happening in Hong Kong. Usually wherever human beings are thriving, they always try to keep in control of their direct environment. But in this bustling city, trees can grow impressively on residential buildings. They are the proof that our control is not ever-lasting and they show us how this very loss of control can bring true beauty. Wild Concrete is about nature taking back, it is a demonstration of the tenacity of life in our urban environment."

urbangeographies:

CHICAGO: Evolving spatial patterns of income inequality
There are many ways to contextualize America’s growing economic and racial inequality: through the growth of new tech hubs in old industrial cities, the cost burden of inadequate transit access, or simply by comparing the lowest and highest earners in each region.
In the case of Chicago, this series of maps, which show the disappearing middle class since 1970, may be the most striking and easy-to-process yet.
-40 Years of Chicago’s Rising Inequality, in One GIF
Source:  theatlanticcities

urbangeographies:

CHICAGO: Evolving spatial patterns of income inequality

There are many ways to contextualize America’s growing economic and racial inequality: through the growth of new tech hubs in old industrial cities, the cost burden of inadequate transit access, or simply by comparing the lowest and highest earners in each region.

In the case of Chicago, this series of maps, which show the disappearing middle class since 1970, may be the most striking and easy-to-process yet.

-40 Years of Chicago’s Rising Inequality, in One GIF

Source:  theatlanticcities

Saturday, April 12, 2014

urbangeographies:

"I don’t want to be interesting. I want to be good."

Happy Birthday Ludwig Mies van der Rohe!

"Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (1886-1969), a German-born architect and educator, is widely acknowledged as one of the 20th century’s greatest architects. By emphasizing open space and revealing the industrial materials used in construction, he helped define modern architecture.

Our built environment is meant to be lived in. Mies’ buildings, beyond merely affecting our lives, endow them with greater significance and beauty. His buildings radiate the confidence, rationality, and elegance of their creator and, free of ornamentation and excess, confess the essential elements of our lives. In our time, where there is no limit to excess, Mies’ reductionist approach is as pertinent as ever. As we reduce the distractions and focus on the essential elements of our environment and ourselves, we find they are great, intricate, and beautiful. Less is more.” [via]

Photo credits found here 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

(Source: archatlas)

Friday, April 11, 2014
Find meaning. Distinguish melancholy from sadness. Go out for a walk. It doesn’t have to be a romantic walk in the park, spring at its most spectacular moment, flowers and smells and outstanding poetical imagery smoothly transferring you into another world. It doesn’t have to be a walk during which you’ll have multiple life epiphanies and discover meanings no other brain ever managed to encounter. Do not be afraid of spending quality time by yourself. Find meaning or don’t find meaning but “steal” some time and give it freely and exclusively to your own self. Opt for privacy and solitude. That doesn’t make you antisocial or cause you to reject the rest of the world. But you need to breathe. And you need to be. Albert Camus, Notebooks, 1951-1959  (via thatkindofwoman)

(Source: starrywavves)

staceythinx:

Sand Babel designed by Qiu Song, Kang Pengfei, Bai Ying, Ren Nuoya, Guo Shen won an honorable mention in the 2014 eVolo Skyscraper Competition for its innovative use of sand in its design and construction.

About the project:

Sand Babel is a group of ecological structures designed as scientific research facilities and tourist attractions for the desert. The structures are divided into two parts. The first part, above ground, consists of several independent structures for a desert community while the second part is partially underground and partially above ground connecting several buildings and creating a multi-functional tube network system.

The main portion of each building is constructed with sand, sintered through a solar-powered 3D printer. The top structures are based on the natural phenomena called Tornadoes and Mushroom Rocks, which is very common in deserts. It utilizes a spiral skeleton structure, which is tall, straight and with strong tension, to meet the requirements of residential, sightseeing and scientific research facilities. The dual funnel model not only improves cross-ventilation, but also generates water condensation atop the structures based on temperature differences. The net structure for the portion of underground and surface is similar to tree roots. This design not only helps to keep flowing sand dunes in place but also facilitates communication among the buildings.

via Radiant Spirit

Sacred Geometry is known as the architecture of the universe. Found throughout the natural world, it is all around us as an aspect of the true matrix. Sacred Geometry has a unique appeal to both left and right brain ways of thinking simultaneously. It satisfies the left brain desire for the logical, sequential and objective data or “looking at the parts.” It also satisfies the right brain desire for random, intuitive and subjective data, the “study of the whole.”
…The Dodecagon (12 sided polygon) pictured on this page is achieved when the arms of the six-pointed star in the center intersect the outer rims of the six circles. A perfect division of space into twelve parts is formed.
This geometrical form is also known as a sub-grid that yields many beautiful patterns. Representing the known and the unknown in the cosmos. This grid calls to mind infinity, the omnipresent, the beautiful structure of nature and promise of creativity. You might find it intriguing that this dodecagon is also made from six squares and six equilateral triangles fitted around a hexagon. While our eye is unable to see the fourth dimension, viewing the different shapes moving in and out within this polygon taking on 2 and 3 dimensional forms is very pleasing and fun.

via Radiant Spirit

Sacred Geometry is known as the architecture of the universe. Found throughout the natural world, it is all around us as an aspect of the true matrix. Sacred Geometry has a unique appeal to both left and right brain ways of thinking simultaneously. It satisfies the left brain desire for the logical, sequential and objective data or “looking at the parts.” It also satisfies the right brain desire for random, intuitive and subjective data, the “study of the whole.”

…The Dodecagon (12 sided polygon) pictured on this page is achieved when the arms of the six-pointed star in the center intersect the outer rims of the six circles. A perfect division of space into twelve parts is formed.

This geometrical form is also known as a sub-grid that yields many beautiful patterns. Representing the known and the unknown in the cosmos. This grid calls to mind infinity, the omnipresent, the beautiful structure of nature and promise of creativity. You might find it intriguing that this dodecagon is also made from six squares and six equilateral triangles fitted around a hexagon. While our eye is unable to see the fourth dimension, viewing the different shapes moving in and out within this polygon taking on 2 and 3 dimensional forms is very pleasing and fun.

exhibition-ism:

Incredible anatomical collage works from Travis Bedel - follow him on Tumblr HERE

calumet412:

Proposal for development of the Outer Drive at Randolph, 1929, Chicago.
Note the north side of Randolph - this was a proposed rail terminal.

In effect, it is a rail terminal- just a subterranean one.  There is a Metra terminus under Millennium Park for some of the southbound lines.

calumet412:

Proposal for development of the Outer Drive at Randolph, 1929, Chicago.

Note the north side of Randolph - this was a proposed rail terminal.

In effect, it is a rail terminal- just a subterranean one.  There is a Metra terminus under Millennium Park for some of the southbound lines.

Thursday, April 10, 2014
architectureofdoom:

Großes Schauspielhaus, Berlin, Hans Poelzig, 1919, demolished in 1988

architectureofdoom:

Großes Schauspielhaus, Berlin, Hans Poelzig, 1919, demolished in 1988

(Source: andgatherer)

mymodernmet:

Each year, during the La Scala Flower Festival, about 2,000 potted plants and flowers of different shades and colors are arranged on the historic Staircase of Santa Maria del Monte to create one grand design.